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I taught for several years at a residential school for children with emotional disabilities before staying home after the birth of my second daughter. I returned to teaching, finished my Educational Leadership program in May of 2012, and now work as our district's Writing and Social Studies Coordinator. I have always loved writing and find constant inspiration from my family. Maybe someday, I will get to see my name on the cover of a book!

Tuesday, February 2, 2016

Running errands was more than I expected...


On Tuesdays, the community of Two Writing Teachers hosts the Slice of Life. Join the incredible community by writing a snippet of life, or even join with just a comment or two. Everyone is welcome!

My youngest daughter and I took a trip to the grocery store and CVS this afternoon. She had a list of ingredients for a special dinner she wants to make, and I had a 25% off coupon at CVS. The weather is unseasonably warm, I was home reasonably early, and she had completed her homework--we were feeling happy with life.

We made it through the grocery store--the avocados were a little hard, so Cecily will cook for us tomorrow night--and we headed to CVS. When we arrived, I parked, we got out of the car, and walking in, I saw a shoe on the sidewalk. A man was standing in the middle of a parking space. When I looked down, there was a woman on all fours dripping blood from her nose. One of her stockinged feet was shoeless.

"Do you know her?" I asked the man.

He shook his head. "She just fell," he answered. "She caught a foot on the curb, and she fell right on her nose."

He and I stayed with her, me rubbing her back. Someone from the store called 911, another person called her husband, and Cecily got a chair from inside. Someone brought paper towels and rubber gloves, and we waited with her until help arrived. Joanne was coherent and embarrassed, having been on a special mission to get Valentine's Day cards for her grandchildren. That mission will probably include a trip to the ER to get some stitches.

My father fell down the basement stairs almost 14 years ago and sustained a head injury that changed all of our lives. We all walk so precariously close to unseen edges, and it takes so little time to slip or take a wrong step or misjudge a situation. I know that I am still haunted by my father's accident, but I am also more appreciative moments and grateful for all the joy I have in my life.

Happy Slicing,





17 comments:

  1. What great timing you had today. You being there was very serendipitous, despite bringing up bad memories.

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  2. I'm glad you and Cecily (and the other man) were there to help. Your help was undoubtedly exceedingly compassionate.

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  3. That just right timing that meant you were there at the moment when you could help - truly a good Samaritan! You knew exactly why this incident could not be ignored! What a great lesson for all at CVC and Cecily as well!

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  4. That just right timing that meant you were there at the moment when you could help - truly a good Samaritan! You knew exactly why this incident could not be ignored! What a great lesson for all at CVC and Cecily as well!

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  5. Yes, we really living on the edge of something ... and having lived through it, you appreciated the moment for what it was, and stepped up. Cecily learned something important, too. Well done, my friend.

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  6. Yes, we really living on the edge of something ... and having lived through it, you appreciated the moment for what it was, and stepped up. Cecily learned something important, too. Well done, my friend.

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  7. Oh, no! I hope that lady is ok now. Thank you for stopping your own life to help her out! Many people would not do that these days. Great lesson for all of us! Jennifer Sniadecki

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  8. That poor woman! So glad that you were there to lend moral support. It sounds like you and Cecily made a hard experience much less unpleasant.

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  9. That poor woman! So glad that you were there to lend moral support. It sounds like you and Cecily made a hard experience much less unpleasant.

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  10. Thank goodness you were there. Not only for that woman, but for your child as well-she needs to see compassion-there's not enough of it out there!

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  11. It is so important to slow down and appreciate each moment. We are all only one moment away from a life changing event.
    Clare

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  12. What an experience. So human and connected. The waiting and the caring for - so very important.

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  13. I'm glad that you and your daughter and the man were there to help, Melanie. I know one minute can change everything. Love hearing that your daughter is going to cook, too.

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  14. Unseen edges, indeed. I hope Joanne will be okay, and am glad that you, Cecily, and others were there to comfort her. As the Dali Lama says, "Be kind whenever possible. It is always possible."

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  15. Life. Unpredictable. We try so hard to be in control. Hmm. It breaks my heart. It could be any one of us on the ground. Thank you for sharing this moment with us. Reminding us to be present. Glad that man, you and Cecily were present for her.

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  16. This piece is so well timed too. Loved the suspense in the desciprtion early on (I was afraid she'd been hit). My favorite line though is how you tease out the message with "We all walk precariously close to unseen edges." Indeed we do. Such honest writing--great piece.

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  17. Life changes in an instant. You have lived it and witnessed it. Thank goodness you were there to help the woman!

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